Back in the Groove

I feel like I’m finally getting back into running.

After that god-awful run the other week, I picked up a cheap armband for my phone and downloaded Runkeeper. I’m a bit of a stat nerd and after just 3 runs with it, I’m considering purchasing the full version. £13.99 for a year isn’t that big of a deal for me. You can program it to run a certain distance, intervals or time, and it tells you all different stats as you’re running along.

We haven’t done any more really early runs like the one I wrote about before. Rob hasn’t got the motivation at the moment, but I’m sure he will once the 5K gets a bit closer. I went out on my own to just do a 20 minute run a few days after the run-of-death, just to prove to myself I could do it. And I did. I felt so much better – I paced myself a lot better, had some music I knew and could just zone out to and my asthma didn’t play up quite as badly. I still felt a bit sick, though. I think this time I drank too much water, so I’ve now started drinking less beforehand and got a little running bottle to bring with me. My hands are too small to handle a 500ml one, but luckily the 300ml one is just right. I seriously have tiny hands. My family refer to them as my “paws”.

Rob then came out with me on Saturday morning for another 20 minutes. I kept us at a slower pace again and felt even better than last time. Also got Rob to carry the water bottle for the second half of the run, so that was a bonus! Rob’s running with his iPod shuffle so it was me calling the times out for him. At the end he’d thought I’d stopped for a break rather than because we’d finished, so he’s probably in pretty good shape from all the cycling he does.

Which brings me to today. I woke up feeling pretty good, so I thought I’d try 30 minutes for the first time since I finished Couch to 5K. The weather was cool but not too cold, the wind wasn’t too brisk and my lungs weren’t too grumpy. I stopped for a total of about 4 seconds when I choked a bit, and when a dog was trying to sniff my butt, but I completed it and felt so much better about my running. Looking at Runkeeper, I’m keeping my pace really steady and my aim for the 5K of about 35 minutes seems doable. I reckon having more people to chase might spur me on to go a bit faster too, plus I’ve got a couple more weeks of training left.

We’re spending the Bank Holiday in Wales, and I’m not sure whether I fancy running up the hills, but I might get another run in before we leave. We’re doing Go Ape on Sunday though, so that’ll need a bit of fitness!

Happy running!

Advertisements

First Race Sign-Up!

We’ve done it!

This evening I signed me and my boyfriend Rob up for the Run Nottingham with Richard 5k next month.

As I said in my last post, Rob cycles a lot but hasn’t run in months. So he dragged me out of bed at 6am this morning so he could get a run in before work.

I didn’t have time to get my iPod or apps together to do a 20 minute run like we planned, so we were just running to the point I know is roughly 10 minutes’ run away and then turning back. Despite this relatively short distance, it was the worst run I’ve done since I started C25K!

As with all things running, a lot was probably psychological. I was expecting him to struggle so I was doubting myself when he didn’t. When we started, he asked whether I always ran at that speed (implying slowly) so I think I pushed myself harder. It was earlier than I’m used to so the air was colder and it affected my asthma more. I stopped at 10 minutes and started walking. Throughout the whole C25K plan I never stopped when I was supposed to be running. This then made me more down for the last part. Running with no music meant I could only hear my breathing, which made me focus on it more, which made it worse!

To top it all off, I choked on some phlegm near the end and nearly chundered.

All in all, not a brilliant start to my day.

But what have I learned from it?

  • Run with music – I’ll definitely sort that out before our next run.
  • Don’t push myself too hard – Just because I’m running with someone, doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a good idea to try to keep up, but….
  • Push myself an appropriate amount – If I’m feeling good, I’ll make the most of it.
  • Drink more water – Water good, phlegm bad.
  • (Somewhat) slow and steady wins the race – Rob said afterwards that he was glad I paced it slower than he was expecting, he thinks he would have burnt himself out. He also said he would have stopped far earlier if I hadn’t been there.

We’re planning on running again on Thursday. Really hoping it’ll be better, but I’ll keep in mind something Laura says at the end of the Stepping Stones podcast – A bad run is better than no run at all.

Couch to 5k – What Next?

It’s been a while since I’ve finished the C25K plan, so I thought I’d give you an update on what I’ve done since.

I started the Couch to 5k Plus plan the NHS does straight away to try to make sure I didn’t lose focus. I’m not (yet) someone who just runs for the sheer pleasure of it, so I knew I had to find a way to keep running without the plan.

The only run of these I’ve tried so far is Stepping Stones, a (supposedly, more on this later) 30 minute run which gives you certain beats to run to to try to increase your speed (150, 155 and 160 bpm). I’ve done it four times now, and you know what? I hate it.

Firstly, I have no rhythm. I can never figure out whether I’m running too fast, too slow or at the right pace and even when Laura is counting the beats over the music, I still struggle to keep in time. I think part of the reason I liked the original plan was that I could go at my own pace, increasing or decreasing speed as needed. I know that I need a challenge to help me progress, but not one that makes me feel like I can’t even count properly.

Secondly, the lie. Laura says at the start and end that it’s a 30 minute run, but I’d noticed I wasn’t anywhere close to as far as I’d run with the last 30 minute C25K podcast. A couple of runs later, I figured it out. One of the tracks isn’t the five minutes she says it is. Laura actually spells it out at the 20 minute mark, saying you’ve got two minutes at this pace before the final five minute faster burst. The run can only be 27 minutes. Although I’ve completed the run every time, there isn’t as much of a sense of achievement.

Thirdly, I’m in a rut. The C25K+ podcasts have great intentions, but there’s not much to keep you coming back to them, hence why I’ve only run four times in two weeks.

So what can I do from here?

I’ve decided to go for the 5k. Richard Whitehead, the Paralympic champion, is running 40 marathons in 40 days with a 5k thrown in in his hometown of Nottingham. Although we haven’t formally signed up yet, my boyfriend and I are planning to take part. This should give me something to aim for. He’s not run since we quit our gym in November, but he cycles a lot so should have good base fitness. He’s also said he’ll come on a few morning runs with me to see what he can do.

I’ve also bought an arm-strap for my phone so I can try a few apps like RunKeeper to see if that keeps me entertained. I’ve been running with just an iPod Shuffle until now so it’ll be nice to try something different and run with my own music. Any recommendations of music and/or apps would be appreciated.

I’m also planning on attending a Parkrun. I had a look at the last results for our nearest race and the vast majority of people are running way faster than I could, which kind of puts me off a bit although I know it shouldn’t. The only people running roughly the same time I think I could run the distance (33-35 minutes ish) are either much older or much younger than me. Hopefully I’d be able to use the other runners to push me to go faster.

Do you have any other suggestions to keep me motivated?